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discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement live tonight at 8:00 eastern part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> jinger gibson is a congressional reporter with politic coe and here to talk to us about congress avoiding a shutdown but first we want to talk about what's been happening the last 18 hours on in the senate. tell us about the passing of the budget. how long did it take and why? >> the senate voted for more than 13 hours straight on the senate floor and finally arrived at 5:00 this morning on passage of a budget. the rules allow them to amend as much as they can. there are a couple of guys wanting to go until 7:00 or 8:00 this morning. luckily they stopped before that. host: for those who went to sleep at a decent hour and didn't see c-span's coverage ll night, what might they be surprised finding out what happened over night? guest: there were four that tic -- democrats voted against the democratic budget. the keystone pupe line was defeated and some amendment that is republicans were chairing that got done, things that dealt with climate change
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
partnership regime and how foreign is equivalent to civil regimes elsewhere. it is in all the rights to domestic partners. it does not give the name. we said earlier that it cannot call themselves married. they can call themselves whenever they want. >> not if they apply for a passport. >> of their married the cannot do that. >> it is a federal crime. merit on a federaler o form? -- married on a federal form? sides agree both that the word marriage matters. the gays and lesbians as a degradation of some sort of recognition. those of us supporting to a traditional marriage see the word marriage draws on its that is tiedole to procreation and child rearing. we want men and women to understand that marriage is the ideal context in which to raise children, and in a sense to read the fine marriage in a way that eliminates the essential components. >> you have a bunch of people out there raising children right now cannot get married. if you think marriage is an important thing to happen your parents, if you think they would benefit from having unmarried parents. hawthorne and they have all
social issues of our time. including the movement for civil rights. archbishop, leader of the greek orthodox church of america, carried that commitment forward when he marched alongside martin luther king jr. in selma, alabama, in 1965. an iconic photograph of those two great leaders appeared on the cover of "life" magazine. the historical relationship of these two proud communities embodies the greatness of america. on march 25 when we celebrate greek independence day, we salute all those who have struggled for freedom and rededicate ourselves to ensuring that america remains a symbol of fairness and opportunity the world over. i rise today also to mourn the passing of legendary greek american andrew a. athens of chicago. andy lived a life that few could match. he enlisted in the u.s. army in january of 1942 and fought at the famous battle of elal amean in egypt. he obtained the rank of captain and in 1945 was honored with the bronze star and u.s. army commendation medal for his outstanding military service. andy went on to become a successful businessman and walked with kings and
security act of 1935. they were instrumental in the civil rights act of 1964, and their support for world war ii was unmatched in making sure we had workers to deal with what we needed to back home while we had so many people fighting for our country overseas. those are just some of the efforts, but there's more. part of being a part of organized labor has meant so much for this country. if you are a union member, let me just offer a few of the things that you're more likely to have because you're part of a union. one, you will earn higher wages. union members earn 30% more than their nonunion counterparts so you'll have a better chance at a living wainl, the ability to support your -- wage, the ability to support your family because you are part of an union. you will have more on-the-job training. workers are likely to have formal on-the-job training making employees more skilled and adding to productivity. and something i should mention and i should mentioned from the beginning, i have been a small business owner for 25 years, over half of my lifetime. i opened a small business when i h
of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity -- a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, "i may not get there with you. but i want you to know that we, as a people, will get to the promised land." (applause.) so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generat
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)